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February 26, 2015

Light: It’s all around us and is an integral part of our daily lives. Yet it continues to surprise us with its distinctive properties, such as how its various wavelengths can be utilized for imaging things invisible to the naked eye, or how it can store and transmit massive amounts of data, or how it can generate energy.

February 25, 2015

Like the shape-shifting robots of “Transformers” fame, a unique class of proteins in the human body also has the ability to alter their configuration. These so-named intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack a fixed or ordered three-dimensional structure, which can be influenced by exposure to various chemicals and cellular modifications.

January 12, 2015

A team of chemistry and materials science experts from University of California, Santa Barbara and The Dow Chemical Company has created a novel way to overcome one of the major hurdles preventing the widespread use of controlled radical polymerization.

December 10, 2014

UC Santa Barbara’s David Weld leads a team that has been awarded $300,000 to establish the California Institute for Quantum Emulation. His group is one of five to receive the inaugural President's Research Catalyst Awards announced by University of California President Janet Napolitano.
 

October 06, 2014

Nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond are very promising candidates for quantum information processing in the solid state. However, a search to find defects with even more potential has now been launched.

September 18, 2014


Three UC Santa Barbara researchers — a computer scientist, a chemical engineer and a physicist — are among the recent recipients of the National Science Foundation’s Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award. The NSF CAREER Program offers the NSF’s most prestigious awards to young faculty who most effectively integrate research and education.
 

July 16, 2014

Dancing around a marshmallow tower they built themselves, the children shouted: “Ten and a quarter! Ten and a quarter!” They marveled that their group’s tower was the tallest, but some of their sheer joy may have been fueled by the marshmallows themselves.

The group constructed the tower as part of UCSB Summer Science Camp, where 8- to 12-year-olds come to get down and dirty in the name of science. Whether learning about bacteria, DNA and density or building gumdrop domes and dissecting squid, participants are having the time of their lives.

June 23, 2014

Modern computers are not unlike the looms of the industrial revolution: They follow programmed instructions to weave intricate patterns. With a loom, you see the result in a cloth or carpet. With a computer, you see it on an electronic display.

Now a group of physicists and computer scientists funded by Microsoft is trying to take the analogy of interwoven threads to what some believe will be the next great leap in computing, so-called quantum computing.

June 17, 2014

Physicists at UC Santa Barbara have created a microscopic device to assist biologists in making very fast molecular measurements that aid the understanding of protein folding. This development may help elucidate biological processes associated with diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Since proteins in the body perform different functions according to their shape, the folding process is considered a key area of study.

June 06, 2014

CNSI is honored to partner with UCSB’s Technology Management Program to establish the Elings Prize for Entrepreneurship during the recent New Venture Competition. Salty Girl Seafood, which aims to create an online marketplace connecting restaurant chefs with the fishermen who catch the seafood they serve, won the inaugural Elings Prize. Virgil Elings was on hand to award the prize.

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