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May 26, 2016

UC Santa Barbara announced today that it is a Grand Challenges Explorations grant winner; CGE is an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. David Low, a professor in UCSB’s Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, will pursue an innovative global health and development research project titled “Strategy for development of enteric pathogen-specific T2 bacteriophage targeting the essential outer membrane protein BamA.”

May 23, 2016

A device designed to help scientists study water by making it easier and less dangerous to collect water samples was the winning technological innovation at the UC Santa Barbara Technology Management Program’s (TMP) New Venture Competition (NVC) Finals on May 19.

May 19, 2016

Santa Barbara tech startup, Milo Sensors, Inc., wins 2nd place and $100,000 in National Institutes of Health’s challenge to design and produce a low profile, wearable blood alcohol sensor.
Milo was selected out of a nationwide pool by the National Institutes Health and, specifically, the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, based on the evaluation of numerous criteria including accuracy, reliability, design appeal, and function.

May 02, 2016

If using a single atom to capture high-resolution images of nanoscale material sounds like science fiction, think again.

That’s exactly what the Quantum Sensing and Imaging Group at UC Santa Barbara has achieved. Members of physicist Ania Jayich’s lab worked for two years to develop a radically new sensor technology capable of nanometer-scale spatial resolution and exquisite sensitivity. Their findings appear in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

April 15, 2016

Former Elings Fellowship recipient, Himanshu Mishra, had a recent article published in ACS Applied Science & Interfaces magazine regarding "Time-Dependent Wetting Behavior of PDMS Surfaces with Bioinspired, Hierarchical Structures." Please see the link below to the pdf containing his abstract, images, and more.

 

March 10, 2016

The science of nanomaterials and devices has advanced rapidly in the last couple of decades. Think atomically flat graphene crystals, which could have important functions in electronics or new superconductors, which could lead to low-cost medical imaging.

UC Santa Barbara physicist Andrea Young is ready to further advance the field of developing and characterizing nanostructured materials, thanks to a grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Young Investigator Research Program.

March 04, 2016

More than 1,000 community votes were cast in UC Santa Barbara’s third annual Art of Science competition sponsored by the Schuller Lab and the campus’s Center for Science and Engineering Partnerships at the California NanoSystems Institute. From the 40 entries, five winners and five honorable mentions were chosen.

March 04, 2016

More than 1,000 community votes were cast in UC Santa Barbara’s third annual Art of Science competition sponsored by the Schuller Lab and the campus’s Center for Science and Engineering Partnerships at the California NanoSystems Institute. From the 40 entries, five winners and five honorable mentions were chosen.

March 03, 2016

When is a solid not a real solid? When it’s a lattice of ultra-cold atoms held in place not by the covalent and ionic bonds that bind the atoms of “real” solids together — like your chair or your cellular phone — but by light waves.

February 22, 2016

The quickest way to the heart may be through the stomach, but researchers found that the quickest way to achieve clean energy is through the stomach too! Specifically, by making use of enzymes that goats use to digest anything that passes through its stomach.

Titled "Early-Branching Gut Fungi Possess A Large, Comprehensive Array Of Biomass-Degrading Enzymes," the study showed that a natural enzyme found in a goat's guts might give the biofuel industry a much needed boost.