News

Displaying 81 - 90 of 155
May 28, 2014

The CNSI wishes to congratulate Professor Galen Stucky on receiving the 2014 Prince of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Research along with Avelino Corma (Spanish National Research Council) and Mark Davis (CalTech) for their contributions to the development of microporous and mesoporous materials and their applications. The three researchers have made truly remarkable contributions to the design and methods of synthesis of these materials, the study of their properties and the development of their applications in very diverse fields. These include the petrochemical industry, biodegradable plastics and water treatment, improved food quality, new medicines and revolutionary healthcare materials, optoelectronic materials, emission reducing elements and, in short, a broad range of activities in society. Named after the Crown Prince of Spain, this is the highest scientific recognition in Spain and one of the most coveted Europeans scientific awards. Congratulations Galen!

May 06, 2014

UC Santa Barbara’s Fred Wudl, a research professor in chemistry and materials engineering, has received the 2014 Spiers Memorial Award for his many innovative developments in the field of organic electroactive materials and plastic electronics. 

The Spiers Memorial Award is presented in recognition of an individual who has made an outstanding contribution to the field of a Faraday Discussion.

April 23, 2014

A fully functional quantum computer is one of the holy grails of physics. Unlike conventional computers, the quantum version uses qubits (quantum bits), which make direct use of the multiple states of quantum phenomena. When realized, a quantum computer will be millions of times more powerful at certain computations than today’s supercomputers.

A group of UC Santa Barbara physicists has moved one step closer to making a quantum computer a reality by demonstrating a new level of reliability in a five-qubit array. Their findings appear Thursday in the journal Nature.

March 03, 2014

The Fritz London Memorial Prize is awarded to Prof. John M. Martinis in recognition of fundamental and pioneering experimental advances in quantum control, quantum information processing and quantum optics with superconducting qubits and microwave photons. The prize will be presented at the International Meeting of Low Temperature Physics LT27 in Buenos Aires, August 2014.

January 06, 2014

David Weld, an assistant professor of physics at UC Santa Barbara, has been awarded a prestigious Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The award is the highest honor the nation can bestow on a scientist or engineer at the beginning of his or her career.

November 27, 2013

It’s not quite the tricorder that doctors in the legendary sci-fi series Star Trek would use to instantly assess a patient’s condition, but it’s close. A small electronic device can continuously track the level of medicines in an animal’s bloodstream. If it works in people, the device could revolutionize how medicines such as anticancer compounds and antibiotics are monitored and administered for life-threatening conditions.

September 23, 2013

Fiber optics has made communication faster than ever, but the next step involves a quantum leap – literally. In order to improve the security of the transfer of information, scientists are working on how to translate electrical quantum states to optical quantum states in a way that would enable ultrafast, quantum-encrypted communications.

August 08, 2013

Baxter International Inc. is a global diversified healthcare company that applies a unique combination of expertise in medical devices, pharmaceuticals, and biotechnology to advance patient care worldwide. To further promote innovative research, Baxter sponsors an annual award program for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Baxter’s Young Investigator Awards are intended to stimulate and reward research applicable to the development of therapies and medical products that save and sustain patients’ lives.

June 11, 2013

Researchers at UC Santa Barbara develop a new method of controlling crystallization of organic semiconductors and increasing the yield of devices to nearly 100 percent using a low-cost, sugar-based additive

Pages